Schnellsuche

The Fine Art Society to celebrate their history on New Bond Street with a sale at Sotheby's

  • Auktion
    The Fine Art Society to celebrate their history on New Bond Street with a sale at Sotheby's
    07.02.2019

THE FINE ART SOCIETY 142 YEARS ON NEW BOND STREET

One of London’s Oldest Commercial Art Gallery To Offer Over 300 Works at Sotheby’s In an Auction to Celebrate their History on New Bond Street

LONDON 10 December 2018 - After 142 years on New Bond Street, one of London’s oldest commercial art gallery, The Fine Art Society relocated from their iconic Mayfair space earlier this year. To mark this new chapter, they are to offer over 300 works in an auction at Sotheby’s in February. Since its foundation in 1876, The Fine Art Society has championed living artists, either bringing their work to the public’s attention for the first time, or presenting it in unexpected ways. Such has been the impact of this historic institution on the evolution of the art market, that its story is in many ways also that of Bond Street, and of the wider London art world.

The sale in February 2019 will include pieces by some of the most prominent artists of the last 150 years. From James McNeil Whistler, whose ideas influenced not only the art world but also the broader culture of the late 19th-century, to the ‘godfather’ of British Pop Art, Sir Peter Blake, luminary artists whose histories are entwined with that of the Society will help tell the extraordinary story of this London institution.

When The Fine Art Society’s founders signed the lease on ‘a fancy goods shop’ at number 148 New Bond Street in 1876, they were the first gallerists to set up in an area which has now become the centre of London’s art world (Sotheby’s moved in across the road in 1917). When they commissioned the progressive English architect-designer E.W. Godwin to redesign the this five-story Mayfair townhouse in 1881, they became the first gallery to commission a purpose built gallery space. In the same year, when they launched major shows of Samuel Palmer and John Everett Millais, they became pioneers of the ‘one-man exhibition’. And when in 1883 they allowed Whistler to hang his Venetian etchings (a project commissioned by the gallery), in a continuous line, single-hung, on white felt walls, this was the start of our modern concept of how exhibitions and art galleries should look.

The Fine Art Society Chair, Annamarie Phelps CBE, said: “This sale is a celebration of The Fine Art Society’s contribution to the British art world since the Victorian era, when our shows shocked, delighted and occasionally scandalised audiences. The artworks we have selected are those which are most representative of our time on New Bond Street, and illustrate some of our long-forgotten stories. We have always been a contemporary art gallery and we have always looked forward. In this spirit, after nearly 150 years on New Bond Street, the time has come to find a new location for The Fine Art Society where we can continue to develop our artistic programme for the next 150 years. The sale marks the end of one chapter and the beginning of an exciting new one.”

Harry Dalmeny, Sotheby’s UK Chairman, said: "Throughout their history, The Fine Art Society has always embraced what is cutting edge and new, whilst never afraid of being a little unconventional and recherché at the same time. The radical approach of this New Bond Street gallery in the Victorian era provided the prototype for the modern 'white cube' art spaces we see across the world today. Now, this sale offers collectors the chance to buy their own piece of the history of this venerable London institution.

A look inside the collection...

James McNeil Whistler
Of all the artists with which the Society is most associated with, none are more significant than James McNeil Whistler, one of the first and most illustrious artists to show in the galleries. His exhibitions at The Fine Art Society in the early 1880s caused shockwaves, not least his 1883 show ‘Arrangement in Yellow’, which saw the gallery transformed with yellow mouldings, skirting boards, carpet, fireplace, and yellow livery for staff. His displays were to impact exhibition design so dramatically that their influence is still seen on curators today. The sale will include eleven prints by the artist, including Whistler’s The Rialto (est. £7,000 – 10,000). In the late 1870s, Whistler found himself bankrupted after pursing an expensive (but successful) lawsuit against critic and fellow artist, John Ruskin, who had accused the artist of ‘flinging a pot of paint in the public’s face’. The Fine Art Society sponsored the artist’s trip to Venice in 1879, and over fourteen months he produced 50 etchings, including this view of the bustling Rialto bridge captured from a first floor window about the Sottoportico Pirieta, later unveiled at The Fine Art Society. Whistler’s approach to printmaking was unprecedented. At the time, prints were predominantly used as a means of reproducing painting, but he transformed it into a medium in its own right and made market history being the first artist to produce etchings in signed, limited editions.








Neue Kunst Auktionen
Vorbericht 127. Auktion – Alte
Das Frühjahr 2019 präsentiert sich im Kinsky mit Ausflügen in...
Sotheby's Fourth Sale of
March 2019, London: This April, Sotheby’s dedicated...
Ausstellung im Museum der
Von MI 03. April bis SO 28. April 2019 stellen die 8 Künstler...
Meistgelesen in Auktionen
Kunstauktion 140, Frank Peege
Das Auktionshaus Peege in Freiburg lädt Sie zu seiner...
Vorbericht 127. Auktion – Alte
Das Frühjahr 2019 präsentiert sich im Kinsky mit Ausflügen in...
Sotheby's Fourth Sale of
March 2019, London: This April, Sotheby’s dedicated...
  • Peter Blake, The Fine Art Society flag print, 2012,est. £700 – 1,000.
    Peter Blake, The Fine Art Society flag print, 2012,est. £700 – 1,000.
    Sotheby’s Auktionshaus
  • James McNeil Whistler, The Rialto, 1879 -80, est.£7,000 – 10,000
    James McNeil Whistler, The Rialto, 1879 -80, est.£7,000 – 10,000
    Sotheby’s Auktionshaus
  • Gluck, Flora’s Cloak, circa 1923_£80,000 – 120,000
    Gluck, Flora’s Cloak, circa 1923_£80,000 – 120,000
    Sotheby’s Auktionshaus
  • George James Frampton_Peter Pan_£80,000 - 120,000
    George James Frampton_Peter Pan_£80,000 - 120,000
    Sotheby’s Auktionshaus
  • George Falkner Armitage, mahogany table with slides, £10,000 – 15,000
    George Falkner Armitage, mahogany table with slides, £10,000 – 15,000
    Sotheby’s Auktionshaus
Bilderaktuell von den Auktionen
beginn 3 wochen
beginn 2 wochen
beginn 1 woche